OT Program Outcomes

National Board of Certification of Occupational Therapist Results

In accordance with changes in ACOTE standard A.4.2, NBCOT data are now calculated and reported differently than they were previously. Because this is a new format longitudinal data are not yet available. Specifically, data are reported by calendar year for new graduates passing the exam within one year of graduation.
As a result of the current curriculum design in the School of Occupational Therapy, students graduate in August so the NBCOT pass rate data represents a blend of students from two graduating classes. Therefore the 2013 data contain both 2012 graduates who took the exam from January 1, through August, 2013 and 2013 graduates who took the exam from August through December 31, 2013.
For Calendar year 2013, January 1 through December 31, Husson new graduates taking the NCBOT exam within one year of graduation had a pass rate of 76% (see NBCOT).

Graduation rates

August, 2013: In Fall, 2010 we had twenty-five students enter the professional phase of the program. This represents a blend of students who were enrolled in the BS/MS program and those who already has an undergraduate degree and were enrolled in the MS-only program. Twenty of the twenty-five students graduated; three students were dismissed for academic reasons and two changed their major of study. (20 out of 25 = 80% graduation rate)
August, 2012: In Fall 2009, thirty-eight students entered the professional phase. In August 2012 thirty-seven students graduated with an MS degree in OT; of those who started the professional phase in that cohort, only one withdrew without graduating with an MS in Occupational Therapy (37 out of 38 = 97.4% graduation rate).
August 2011: In August 2011, thirty-three students graduated with no attrition from the professional phase (100% graduation rate).

As of May 15, 2014 of the 20 graduates in August and December 2013, 5 have either not yet taken or not yet passed the NBCOT exam. Of those who have not yet passed NBCOT, 3 are working on a temporary license in OT positions, the remaining 2 are working in non-OT positions. Of the 15 who have passed the NBCOT, 12 have positions in OT. Of the 3 remaining, 1 is working in a non-OT position and 2 have not responded to our e-mail requests for information.