FAQs on Nursing Education

  1. If accepted to the program, will I qualify for any Financial Aid assistance?
  2. How does the nurse educator role differ between academic and clinical settings?
  3. What can I do to make my application "glowing"?
  4. What does my MAT or GRE score need to be for admission into the program?
  5. What does my GPA need to be for admission into the program?
  6. What should I write in my self-evaluation and goal statement?
  7. How much can I work during the program?
  8. Am I responsible for finding my own preceptors?
  9. What if I want to study part-time?
  10. What will help me prepare for school?
  11. If I live a considerable distance from the Husson campus, will there be an opportunity to participate in courses by distance education methods?
  12. When will classes be conducted?

1. If accepted to the program, will I qualify for any Financial Aid assistance?
The University has recently been a recipient of funding through the Nurse Faculty Loan Program (NFLP) and the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRP-NFLP). Application for funding is made in the Spring and the University is typically notified in the Fall. If funding is received, graduate students in the MSN-Nursing Education track may qualify for these monies. The student is always encouraged to apply for outside scholarships, as well. Information about NFLP can be found at: http://bhpr.hrsa.gov/nursing/grantprograms.htm and click on "Program Details" listed under "Nurse Faculty." NFLP award funding for students who apply are based on a first-come, first-serve basis.


2. How does the nurse educator role differ between academic and clinical settings?
Nursing faculty working in academia provide classroom and clinical instruction to a diverse group of students across varied types of educational settings. Clinical educators are employed in a variety of acute care and community settings providing education that includes staff development and continuing education, as well as patient-focused education. Both roles require in-depth knowledge of educational theories and principles known as pedagogy.


3. What can I do to make my application "glowing"?

Each applicant is reviewed as a whole. The Miller Analogy Test (MAT) or Graduate Record Examination (GRE) test scores, goal statement, letters of reference, extracurricular activities, language skills, activities on-the-job, research activities, work experience, professional organization activities, and previous GPA's are all considered when the application is reviewed. Other helpful tips: Be sure to ask colleagues to review your goal statement. Take a review course or practice exams for the MAT test. Include examples of on-the job activities as well as any volunteer and professional activities on your resume. Make sure to ask your colleagues for "excellent" references and have them give specific reasons why they believe in your success.


4. What does my MAT or GRE score need to be for admission into the program?
We look at the total overall score between all three sections of the exam. There is no "magic" number that the score has to exceed. The overall application package is reviewed as a whole.


5. What does my GPA need to be for admission into the program?
A GPA of 3.0 is expected for admission into the Graduate Program in the Department of Nursing. If you feel that your previous GPA does not reflect of your current ability, we would be happy to discuss this with you.


6. What should I write in my self-evaluation and goal statement?
You should be very clear about why you want to study in the Nursing Education program. Your statement should reflect how you have made this decision and your future goals.


7. How much can I work during the program?
Most of our students can, and do, work. However, as their programs progress, students find they may need to reduce their hours of regular employment or take per diem positions. Full-time work is discouraged.


8. Am I responsible for finding my own preceptors?
Our faculty and clinical coordinator will work with you to find the preceptors who are best suited for your area of specialization. You will be expected to provide input into the preceptor selection process, as well as planning your “clinical” experiences. Husson University will be responsible for coordinating the necessary clinical documentation.


9. What if I want to study part-time?

This program is a progressive and additive program. Part-time status over three years is possible.


10. What will help me prepare for school?
Rest and relaxation before school starts are helpful! Also, computer proficiencies in word processing, internet browsing, and email is essential.


11. If I live a considerable distance from the Husson campus, will there be an opportunity to participate in courses by distance education methods?
Husson utilizes different modes of distance education including interactive video and web-based discussion boards. Many of the program courses have this capability. There are some course components that must be taught on-site.


12. When will classes be conducted?
Classes will be held Friday afternoons and evenings, or every other Saturday. Summer courses will be held on a week-night, or every other Saturday. The faculty recognizes that everyone needs some down time and we try very hard to keep August a month without classes.